Antiplasmodial, analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of crude Guiera senegalensis leaf extracts in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei

Authors

  • Jigam, A. A. Malaria and Trypanosomiasis Research Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria. Author
  • Akanya, H. O. Malaria and Trypanosomiasis Research Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria. Author
  • Dauda, B. E. N. Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria Author
  • Ogbadoyi, E. O. Malaria and Trypanosomiasis Research Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria. Author

Abstract

Guiera senegalensis Gmel (combretaceae) is a common herbal antipyretic and antimalarial among some tribal groups in northern Nigeria. Leaf extracts of the plant were thus tested for antiplasmodial, analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in vivo. Phytochemical screening indicated the presence of alkaloids, glycosides, tannins and flavonoids. The extracts had no adverse effects at 600 mg/kg body weight (bw) with LD50 of 2800 mg/kg body weight. G. senegalensis extract significantly (p < 0.05) suppressed the parasites in mice but exhibited no prophylactic activity. It also exhibited analgesic activity with no anti inflammatory effect.

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Published

2011-06-30

How to Cite

Antiplasmodial, analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of crude Guiera senegalensis leaf extracts in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei. (2011). Nigerian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 26(1), 33-38. https://www.nsbmb.org.ng/journals/index.php/njbmb/article/view/264